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President-elect Donald Trump delivers his victory speech early Wednesday morning in New York City. (Hill 'n Holler photo from cbsnews.com live stream)

President-elect Donald Trump delivers his victory speech early Wednesday morning in New York City. (Hill ‘n Holler photo from cbsnews.com live stream)

New York, N.Y. — Talk about dense. The Democratic Party Tuesday night clung to its “loser” as they went down in defeat, still hoping to put a “spin” on defeat and fastly refusing to admit what cost them the election was that they could not win with a status quo candidate.
The status quo media for a time refused to project Trump the winner and finally uttered the words after Clinton made he call to Trump and Trump told the world.
Several talking heads pointed out the irony of the fact that Trump had been criticized for his refusal to say that he would concede defeat, and as it turned out it was Hillary and her camp who initially kept their mouths shut.
The only Democrat going into this election who recognized that this country was in revolution was Bernie Sanders, and Bernie was also a threat to the status quo.
While both Sanders and Trump could draw huge, enthusiastic crowds, Hillary usually would draw only a small crowd.
In a speech characterized by many as totally different in tone from previous speeches, Donald Trump graciously claimed victory here Tuesday morning with words of praise for Clinton and promises for “Our Movement” of getting to work on promises to rebuild America.
“To all Republicans and Democrats and independents across this nation, I say it is time for us to come together as one united people,” Trump said. “I pledge to every citizen of our land that I will be president for all of Americans, and this is so important to me. For those who have chosen not to support me in the past, of which there were a few people, I’m reaching out to you for your guidance and your help so that we can work together and unify our great country.”
Trump easily carried Arkansas and Tuesday night had kind words for Republican Mike Huckabee, a former Arkansas governor. (Politico has listed Huck as a possible candidate for Secretary of Commerce.)
To view a transcript from Vox of Trumps remarks, click HERE.
Hillary Clinton took Democrats down initially except for Senate candidate Tammy Duckworth in Illinois. Wednesday afternoon it was announced Democratic Gov. Maggie Hassan won the Senate seat in New Hampshire. Democratic Senate candidates in Arkansas and Missouri were among the losers. With Trump in office the Democrats needed to gain five seats to control the Senate.
In Arkansas State Rep. Scott Baltz (D 61st Dist.) was, however, among those winning re-election.
Arkansas Tuesday became the first Bible Belt state  to approve medical marijuana. Voters in Florida and North Dakota also legalized medical marijuana. Recreational marijuana use was legalized in California, Nevada and Massachusetts, along with Maine, apparently, by less than 1 percent, and defeated in Arizona.
Trump got a call from President Barack Obama at 3 a.m. last night but  neither side would say what as said. Later Obama said he congratulated Trump and invited him to come to the White House Thursday. The meeting is scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. CST.
Trump also received a telegram from Russian President Vladimir Putin with congratulations. The Kremlin said in a statement that Putin expressed “his hope to work together for removing Russian-American relations from their crisis state.” Putin said he was confident that “equality, mutual respect and a real accounting (of) each other’s positions” would lead to constructive dialogue between Moscow and Washington.
It was no surprise that Trump carried Arkansas and Missouri. Voter turnout at small town locations was described as heavy Tuesday.
Hillary Clinton issued a statement late Wednesday morning. She said, “I hope that he (Trump) will be a successful President for all Americans. . . . We owe him an open mind and the chance to lead.” Further, she encouraged her supporters to “do all we can to keep advancing the causes and values we all hold dear.” To view a transcript from TIME of her remarks, preceded by an introduction by Tim Kaine, click HERE.
President Obama spoke to his staff and the press just after noon Wednesday.  He said, “we have to remember that we’re actually all on one team. This is an intramural scrimmage. We’re not Democrats first. We’re not Republicans first.  We are Americans first. We’re patriots first.  We all want what’s best for this country.  That’s what I heard in Mr. Trump’s remarks last night. . . .what the country needs — a sense of unity; a sense of inclusion,; a respect for our institutions, our way of life, rule of law; and a respect for each other.” Obama pledged that his team would help provide for a smooth orderly transition, as President George W. Bush had provided for him, To view a transcript of his full remarks from the White House, click HERE.
In a statement Wednesday U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren proposed that she and President-elect Donald Trump “put aside our differences” and work together to rebuild the American economy for working people. She said the integrity of U.S. democracy is more important than an individual election. She said she hopes Trump will fulfill the role of President “with respect and concern for every single person in this country, no matter who they are.”
Climate Reality Project Chairman Al Gore Wednesday afternoon wrote, “Last night President-elect Trump said he wanted to be a President for all Americans. In that spirit, I hope that he will work with the overwhelming majority of us who believe that the climate crisis is the greatest threat we face as a nation. I wish him well in these efforts and intend to do everything I can to work with him and his administration to ensure that our nation remains a leader in the global effort to meet this challenge.” To view his full statement, click HERE.
In any case Trump won the election with an Electoral College vote of at least 279 and as many as 306, and Clinton receiving 228-232 votes, with Michigan, New Hampshire and Arizona yet to be decided. A vote of at least 270 was required. Chosen electors of the Electoral College will vote for president when they meet on Dec. 19 in their respective state capitals. Technically a few “faithless electors” could vote for Hillary Clinton. However, for many to do this would be unprecedented, and, given the 306-232 margin (74 votes), this would even more highly unlikely.
However, with 99 percent of the vote recorded, Clinton was reported as receiving 59,814,018 votes (48%) with Trump receiving 59,611,678 votes (47%), a difference of 202,340 votes. Combined Libertarian Gary Johnson and Green Party Jill Stein received 5,272,603 votes (4%).
Candidates not winning the popular vote have become President four previous times in U.S. history: George W. Bush over Al Gore (2000, 271-266 electoral votes, 47.9%-48.4%); Benjamin Harrison over Grover Cleveland (1888, 233-188 electoral votes, 47.8%-48.6%); Rutherford B. Hayes over Samuel Tilden (1876, 1 electoral vote difference, 47.9%-50.9%); and John Quincy Adams over Andrew Jackson (1824, neither receiving enough electoral college votes to win, Adams selected by House of Representatives, 30.9%-41.4%).
Initially Bernie Sanders was quoted as saying “We have nothing polite to say right now” about Trump’s election. Later Sanders, who likely will remain as ranking minority member of the Senate Budget Committee, on Facebook noted “Donald Trump tapped into the anger of a declining middle class that is sick and tired of establishment economics, establishment politics and the establishment media.” However, he continued, “To the degree that Mr. Trump is serious about pursuing policies that improve the lives of working families in this country, I and other progressives are prepared to work with him. To the degree that he pursues racist, sexist, xenophobic and anti-environment policies, we will vigorously oppose him.”
This afternoon and evening protests to the election of Trump — with numbers ranging from a few hundred to thousands — were underway in Chicago, New York, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Boston, Washington, D.C., Portland, Ore., St. Paul, Minn. and several other cities. Slogans included “Not My President,” “No Racist U.S.A.,” “Impeach Donald Trump,” “Nasty Women Fight Back” and “White Males for Equality for All.” Violence was in some cases present but limited and in other cases not present.
Many hope for unity and positive progress; others doubt that will occur. Only time will tell.
Caroll Lucas and Howard Elliott

Vice President-elect Mike Pence introduced Donald Trump before the president-elect gave his victory speech early Wednesday morning. (Hill 'n Holler photo from cbsnews.com live stream)

Vice President-elect Mike Pence introduced Donald Trump before the president-elect gave his victory speech early Wednesday morning. (Hill ‘n Holler photo from cbsnews.com live stream)


The scene of the4 victory celebration for Donald Trump early Wednesday morning. (Hill 'n Holler photo from cbsnews.com live stream)

The scene of the4 victory celebration for Donald Trump early Wednesday morning. (Hill ‘n Holler photo from cbsnews.com live stream)


Chicago and New York City were among the cities where protests of Trump's election were taking place Wednesday night. (aljazeera.com photo)

Chicago and New York City were among the cities where protests of Trump’s election were taking place Wednesday night. (aljazeera.com photo)

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